Lightfoot for Mayor

The mayoral contest between Lori Lightfoot and Toni Preckwinkle is a choice between real governmental reform and old-style machine politics. I’ve supported Lightfoot since the day she announced, and I believe she will lead the City forward without leaving its residents behind. Rahm’s plans for Chicago did not include the ordinary citizen. Lightfoot’s plans do.

Lori Lightfoot is a leader, not a boss. She had the courage to challenge Rahm when he seemed all but invincible. She made a strong case for City Hall reform and took it directly to the voters. Her honesty and integrity stood out in that crowded first round of candidates. She is smart and tough but not arrogant. She connects with people, she understands the frustration that turns to anger when government is unaccountable. She knows how to direct that anger into meaningful reform.

Lori Lightfoot campaigning in the 50th Ward in February 2019, listening to aldermanic candidate Andrew Rowlas addressing the crowd.

Lori Lightfoot will help reform City Hall. She opposes aldermanic privilege. She has said that nobody should have to “kiss the alderman’s ring” to get City services, and she recognizes the dangers in allowing aldermen absolute control over zoning and economic development in their wards. Lightfoot can be expected to demand that aldermen be held accountable, and to see that they are. She will not be hand-picking the chairmen of City Council committees. You can bet that Lightfoot won’t be cutting $20,000 checks to aldermen who support her while ignoring their responsibilities to both the City and their constituents.

Lori Lightfoot will help wreck the Chicago Machine. With Lightfoot as mayor, we’ll finally realize the beginning of the end of The Chicago Way. Lightfoot won’t owe her victory to the usual influencers, or the mega-rich, or the out-of-towners. She will be accountable to the people who elect her, not to special interests. Wealthy, powerful people always have a private line to the mayor’s office. But Lori Lightfoot won’t cave. That’s not the Lightfoot way. She didn’t get where she is by going along. She will not tolerate business as usual. The City can’t afford it, and Lightfoot knows it. It’s why she decided to run for mayor.

Lori Lightfoot will help reform Illinois politics. Illinois is widely recognized as the most corrupt state in the U.S. Tens of thousands of people are leaving every year. Many of them are Chicagoans fed up with corruption, high taxes, high fees, and poor services. Illinois may well lose at least one congressional representative because of state population loss. Next year’s national census will redraw congressional, state, and local political maps in 2021.The Fair Maps movement is making progress on state and national levels to eliminate partisan gerrymandering. The boundaries of every ward in the City will be redrawn. The Mayor of Chicago will have a strong influence on all these matters.

Everything about her, from her family history to her professional achievements to the way she has chosen to live her life, tells me that Lori Lightfoot is the right person to lead Chicago.

Lori Lightfoot for Mayor.

 

 

 

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Correction: Lightfoot – Rowlas Event

The correct date to meet Lori Lightfoot and Andrew Rowlas is Wednesday, February 20. I apologize for the error.

Meet Lori Lightfoot and Andrew Rowlas

Join mayoral candidate Lori Lightfoot and 50th Ward aldermanic candidate Andrew Rowlas at a meet and greet in the 50th Ward.on Wednesday, February 20, from 6-8 p.m. at Urban Convene, 2711 West Peterson Avenue.

Lightfoot is one of the original challengers to Mayor Rahm Emmanuel, getting into the race before Rahm dropped out. She has an impressive resume: Assistant United States Attorney, President of the Chicago Police Board, and Chair of the Police Accountability Task Force. She is a reform candidate for mayor, and endorsed Rowlas a few weeks ago. Lightfoot has been endorsed for mayor by the Chicago Sun-Times, which said of her:

“More than any of the other 13 mayoral candidates, she has the vision, values, qualifications and policies to be an effective leader for the whole city, from the hedge fund managers to the fast food workers. She is calm, focused, principled and independent.”  The paper noted that, while mayor would be her first elected office, “…she has been a powerfully influential public servant. She has been an outspoken critic of bad moves by City Hall, calling out her own bosses. She has also — and this is not widely understood — been a force for honesty and integrity behind the scenes.”

Rowlas is a former educator and current community activist. He served as president of the West Ridge Community Organization until stepping down to run for alderman. A strong believer in community empowerment, Rowlas single-handedly arranged to have a referendum on clean drinking water on last November’s ballot in some 50th Ward precincts, and is currently petitioning to have the old Northtown Library become a cultural arts center. He also served as a member of the LEARN Coalition, the group responsible for bringing the community the new Northtown Library.

Rowlas plans to empower 50th ward residents through initiatives like participatory budgeting, a ward zoning committee, and a ward economic and community development council–all measures opposed by current alderman Debra Silverstein.

City Hall and the 50th Ward both need reforming. Come and hear what these two outstanding candidates for political leadership have to say.

Rowlas Wins Lightfoot Endorsement

Andrew Rowlas has been endorsed for 50th Ward alderman by mayoral candidate Lori Lightfoot, who cites his commitment to reform and transparency as major reasons for her belief that he is the best candidate to represent the 50th Ward.

Rowlas is an educator and community activist. A member of the LEARN Coalition, Rowlas was part of the team that suggested building the new library on Western Avenue. He worked for months obtaining signatures on the citizen petition that resulted in the new Northtown Library. He has advocated for longer library hours and is presently obtaining signatures on the petition to transform the old library building into a community cultural center. Last year, as president of the West Ridge Community Organization, Rowlas helped create the Warren Park Advisory Council.

Committed to citizen participation in Ward governance, Rowlas has promised to bring participatory budgeting to the 50th Ward. He also plans to establish a citizen Zoning Advisory Board and promises to build a partnership between residents and business owners to  work together to develop a far-reaching economic and community development plan.

Unlike the alderman, who likes nothing better than to pose in a hard hat with a shovel in her hands but skips the actual hard work of building coalitions and gaining public support for economic and community development projects, Rowlas works well with community residents and businrss owners and listens to and reasons with opponents. He is a team builder and does not claim solo credit for team efforts.

I don’t agree with his views on many issues, but I see him as a leader willing to work with the community for the common good, willing to listen and consider other viewpoints, and committed to the kind of good government–open and transparent–that this Ward desperately needs. Most importantly, he is absolutely committed to developing future leaders for the 50th Ward. Unlike Silverstein, who shuts the community out of ward business and is committed to keeping herself in power, Rowlas believes that engaging with the community in civic matters will create an active, invoved citizenry and produce future leaders committed to public service.

For more information about what Andrew Rowlas believes and what he would do as alderman, visit his website at rowlasforward50.com.

Volunteer for his campaign by contacting Andrew at rowlasforWard50@gmail.com

Don’t forget to attend the two aldermanic forums to meet the candidates in person and hear what they have to say. The first is set for next Thursday, February 7, at 7 p.m. at Devon Bank, 6445 North Western Avenue. It is sponsored by the West Ridge Community Organization.

The second forum is on Sunday, February 10, at 2 p.m. at the Bernard Horwich Center, 3003 West Touhy. It is co-sponsored by the Jewish Neighborhood Development Council, the West Ridge Chamber of Commerce, and the League of Women Voters.

Lori Lightfoot, a former prosecutor and head of the police review board, was one of the original challengers to Mayor Rahm Emanuel. She has a long record of public service accomplishments, and is committed to reforming Chicago’s corrupt political system. You can learn more about Lori Lightfoot and her ideas and plans through her campaign website,  lightfootforchicago.com

 

Campaign News

Tuesday, August 28, is s the first day that candidates for alderman and other City offices can legally ask registered voters to sign nominating petitions.

Andrew Rowlas has released his first campaign newsletter. Contact his campaign to get on the mailing list (rowlasforward50@gmail.com).

Jason Honig is hosting a campaign kickoff at Warren Park on Saturday, August 25, from 11:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m.  Contact his campaign for more information (honigfor50th.com).

Mayoral candidate Lori Lightfoot has released her proposed ethics reform plan. It targets outside jobs for municipal workers and addresses mayoral term limits, among other sound ideas.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/politics/ct-met-lori-lightfoot-chicago-mayor-ethics-proposal-20180820-story.html