The Alderqueen Strikes Again

Like many of you, I received the alderqueen’s newsletter on Wednesday of this week. As usual, it displayed a couple of pictures of Herself enjoying her favorite job activity–having her picture taken.

Like many of you, I missed the community invitation to the official ribbon-cutting of the new Bernie Stone Park at Devon & McCormick. At least Bernie’s family was invited. But Rahm and the alderqueen share a disdain for ordinary folks (you know who you are) and neither of them missed any of us. Rahm clearly doesn’t like to spend any more time in the 50th than he has to. He was in and out of the official groundbreaking for the park so fast that the few people in attendance didn’t know the “event” was over til he rushed away. And Queenie hates mixing with her constituents. Watch for the ribbon-cutting picture to surface in next year’s election campaign.

The newsletter also pictures the alderqueen with the principal of Decatur School. Regular readers will remember that West Ridge nearly lost the school to Rogers Park just last year, and Queenie didn’t lift a finger to help save it. But, in preparation for re-election, she’s suddenly the school’s biggest cheerleader.  That picture, too, will no doubt be used in the campaign to show her support for education.

Here’s what the newsletter didn’t tell you: The owner of the new Hindu temple on Devon managed to get a family member, Jayesh Shewakaramani,  appointed as a Commissioner in Special Services Area #43 (SSA #43), otherwise known as Devon Avenue. This is a special taxing body that assesses a 1.5% extra property tax on all property owners on Devon from Kedzie to Damen and on Western from Granville to Arthur. The temple, now officially declared a religious institution by the Zoning Board of Appeals (only in Chicago!), is exempt from the tax because the temple pays no property taxes. This is true even though the temple’s owner has admitted that the temple is intended to boost the other businesses he owns on Devon.

The appointment was presented to the City Council for approval at last week’s meeting. Interesting, because the SSA’s January 2017 minutes list him as a commissioner already. His status was changed to “Commissioner Applicant” for subsequent meetings. You see how well things are planned in advance? Approach the alderman for support; announce that you are bringing the community together by creating a religious temple that will boost your commercial interests; get a relative on the SSA; abuse residents with “religious” performances next to residential housing, have this abuse enforced by police protection ordered by the alderman.

Only in the 50th Ward.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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West Ridge #3 in Rat Complaints in Chicago

According to today’s DNA Info, West Ridge ranks third in rat complaints in the City of Chicago. Of the 46,879 resident complaints about rats in 2016, 1,529 came from West Ridge. The 2017 City total is already 1,500 complaints higher than 2016.

The article notes that the areas with the greatest number of complaints also have the highest-density population, the greatest number of restaurants, and the largest amount of trash. Construction also plays a role. To be fair, West Ridge includes parts of the 40th and 48th Wards as well as the 50th.

But doesn’t Devon Avenue immediately come to mind?

 

 

 

 

Does Devon Need a Hindu Temple?

The owner of Shree Ganesh Hindu temple at 2545 Devon Avenue has applied for a special use permit that would officially make the storefront temple a religious institution and allow it to operate on Devon Avenue regardless of its impact on the neighborhood. The temple and the alderman took care not to alert neighboring residents and will present  the community with another done deal after the Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) rules in the temple’s favor. This is a foregone conclusion–the alderman backs the plan, yet another example of the way democracy works in Chicago, the ZBA, and the 50th Ward.

Building a Hindu Temple on Devon is a very bad idea and should not simply sail through the approval process without community input.

Understand, I am not opposed to the Hindu temple itself. But Devon is the wrong location for it, it will create severe traffic and parking problems, and the hundreds of tourists who are expected to drive here daily for photo ops will worsen the already heavy air and noise pollution that hang over Devon like clouds some days. It will also drive traffic into residential areas already overburdened by drivers who park haphazardly and shoppers who throw garbage everywhere. Why not build it on Western, which has ample vacant lots for a temple and parking? On a lot that would showcase the 40-foot high rooftop addition and make it easier to photograph without halting traffic?

Oh, wait. When plans were first announced for the temple in late 2016, the daughter of the temple’s owner suggested that only about 150 people would be  expected on a daily basis, about 50 of them living within walking distance. However, she did state clearly that the temple is intended to attract hundreds of tourists to Devon’s Indian shopping area, thus making the temple less about religion than about commerce. Although the family claims that a Hindu temple is needed to bring the community together–this was actually said with a straight face by the temple’s lawyer–its purpose is clearly to draw customers to its owner’s four other businesses.

Despite claims by the temple’s owner that Hindis are increasingly moving to West Ridge, in fact, according to the 2010 U.S. Religious Census, the Chicago Metropolitan area (defined as Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Illinois-Indiana-Wisconsin) claims only 6,000 Hindu adherents out of a total population of more than 9.4 million people. According to The Pew Research Center’s 2008 Religious Landscape Study, only about 1,300 Hindu live in Illinois, or less than 1% of the population. Less than .7% of the U.S. population identifies as Hindu.

What the temple’s owner hears is not a great clamor crying out for community, but merely the ka-ching of his own cash registers.

I might add that the temple used the Republic Bank parking lot, not zoned for religious observances or public performances, to celebrate the end of yet another unannounced (at least to residents) festival held over Labor Day that required setting up four loudspeakers blasting dance music into the homes of residents living just ten feet away.  The affair had the alderman’s full support. The current festival that began on September 21 is scheduled to end on September 30, Yom Kippur, one of the Jewish high holy days. I wonder if Hindu celebrants will set up loudspeakers again to celebrate the triumph of good over evil while others are observing their holy day in quiet prayer and contemplation. Maybe the temple’s business angle gives it immunity from legal obligations and niceties like consideration for others.

You’d think that an additional couple of hundred more cars per day clogging one of the most congested streets in the City would be cause for concern. You’d hope that air quality for residents, including children attending schools located within a block of Devon, would be a priority. You’d assume that ample parking for the vehicles of hundreds of camera-laden tourists would be part of the planning process.  You’d want to know if they’ll be arriving in sedans or RVs. You’d think the impact on nearby residential streets and alleys would be studied. You’d think the community would be invited to consider the problems inherent in placing a temple smack in the middle of a commercial strip surrounded by thousands of dwellings, schools, and senior citizens.

Ha!. This is the 50th Ward.

No traffic, parking, or environmental impact studies are planned. Neither are any community meetings.

You see, Debra Silverstein doesn’t care if the temple has a negative environmental or quality of life impact on the community. She’s never cared much for the southeast end of the ward, and my guess is that it will be ceded to another alderman with the coming ward remap. The formula is simple: election 2019; census 2020; ward redistricting 2021.  She isn’t interested in economic development, either, and the Indian merchants and property owners along Devon run the show, such as it is. Why not build a temple? Let Joe Moore or Harry Osterman or Pat O’Connor deal with the consequences. It won’t be Silverstein’s problem any more.

But the way she went about it should be remembered by every voter in 2019. It’s time for the voters of the 50th Ward to stand up against Silverstein’s secret deals, her unilateral decisions benefiting special interests at the community’s expense, her disregard for residents’ quality of life, her lack of transparency and penchant for secrecy, and her lack of interest in economic development.

Devon Avenue doesn’t need a Hindu temple.

But West Ridge needs an alderman with a vision, a plan, and a talent for leadership.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Securitization Structure”???

Since Ald. Silverstein does not report to the community about City business, I read the newsletters produced by several other aldermen who aren’t afraid to tell their constituents about issues pending in their wards and before the City Council. This week, thanks to  Ald. Scott Waguespack’s newsletter, I learned that the Council will vote in October on a proposed refinancing of City bonds using sales tax revenue held in a “securitization structure” created for that purpose. Let me quote Ald. Waguespack’s report to residents of his 32nd Ward:

“I also want to provide you with this presentation on a new financing scheme we are voting on in October. This scheme would appropriate all Chicago sales tax revenue to this new “corporation” or special entity to refinance about $3 Billion in bonds.  Since there were no known downsides provided during our briefing, we’re reviewing the scheme and welcome any input.”

The words “no known downsides” should strike terror into the heart of every Chicago taxpayer. There are unpleasant surprises lurking, you can bet, and most of them won’t surface until the plan is approved.

Read the plan for yourself. And if you have any questions or suggestions, don’t bother Ald. Silverstein. She doesn’t like constituent input.

Contact Ald. Waguespack: 773/248-1330  OR  ward32@city of Chicago.org

Sculpture at Park 526

Have you seen the sculpture proposed for Park 526, the former theater at Devon & McCormick that will be named for former Ald. Bernie Stone?   Frankly, it just doesn’t appear to have any connection to our neighborhood.

[I think the alderman may have been a bit confused in her newsletter announcement, which stated there were three different proposals for the sculpture; it’s actually one piece with three parts. How closely is she working with DCASE if she doesn’t know that?]

The artist, Bernard Williams, is a highly acclaimed muralist and sculptor, but I think his design misses the mark. Intricate patterns may well fall upon the ground, but does this really “…suggest the complex nature of 50th ward community” as he says? The patterns may be found worldwide, but the piece itself could be placed anywhere in the City. It is not particularly evocative of West Ridge. Indeed, it resembles one of those pieces of generic “public art” that people simply don’t notice as they rush to and from work, lunch, and home. Don’t we want something memorable that captures the spirit of West Ridge?

I wonder why the commission wasn’t given to one of the many talented artists who live in the neighborhood who might have expressed the soul of West Ridge in a more distinctive way. Capturing and reflecting the neighborhood’s complexity is perhaps better accomplished by an artist who experiences that complexity every day. Maybe waiting to see if the park is used and who will be using it would have been a good idea. Given its distance from the rest of the neighborhood, the bridge crossing, and the decision not to include playground equipment, it could become little more than a landscaped vacant lot. Let’s hope not, but let’s not rush the artwork.

There’s no end to the goodies we’re going to see between now and the February 2019 election. The completion of the Devon streetscape, the opening of the new library practically on election day (you know it will be a polling place, just an added reminder of which mayor and which alderman brought it to the ward), and a sculpture in Park 526! The Wizard of Oz couldn’t have done it better.

Alas! No viable challenger in sight; none likely to surface, and the usual Munchkins lining up.

Time to find those ruby slippers.

India Independence Day Celebration to Ignore Laws, Disrespect Neighbors Again

Completed audience and soundstage set-up for 2015 India Day celebration in Republic Bank parking lot. Note that soundstage is directly in front of residential housing, separated only by an alley.

Photo of the 2015 concert. Note how the stage is set directly in front of housing. There’s no good place to put the stage, since there’s housing on both sides of the lot, and the extreme noise cannot be contained but can be heard for blocks and blocks. You know the alderman would never permit this where she lives.

One again the Federation of Indian Associations has arrogantly decided to break Chicago laws so that it can force its celebration of Indian Independence Day on West Ridge residents. Once again it has decided to stage a concert in the Republic Bank parking lot, even though the lot is not zoned for public performances, has no PPA (public place of amusement) license and cannot obtain one, and is located an alley’s width from residential housing, far less than the 125 feet required by law. The committee planning the event has also failed to give neighbors the legally mandated 30-day notice of the planned event, a failure that prevents neighbors from voicing any objections. The event is, however, well-publicized in Indian news-papers, with full-page color ads and photos of invited Illinois politicians–the governor, the mayor, the alderman and Ira–as if inviting them makes such arrogance acceptable. None of them will show up but all will issue mawkish pronouncements about the importance of the Indian community to American democracy.

This is especially galling because Devon’s Indian business community, with only one exception, couldn’t be bothered to acknowledge–let alone celebrate–American Independence Day just six weeks ago. Not a single American flag, not one banner, not one sign in any window acknowledged the birthday of the country that has given Indian-Americans such opportunities. It’s absolutely disgraceful that taxes paid by the very residents the FIA abuses are partly funding this celebration of the independence of a foreign country when not one cent was spent to celebrate July 4.

You’d think a business community first welcomed to the 50th Ward in 1973 would be established enough to celebrate in one of our lovely parks instead of a parking lot.

You’d think the heirs to one of the world’s oldest civilizations would know how to behave, to show others the respect they demand for themselves.

You/d think that a community that makes up only about 8-10% of West Ridge would be more sensitive to its non-Indian neighbors.

You’d be wrong.

The Pakistanis gather in Warren Park for the party after their parade. One look around Devon will tell you how much respect the Indian shoppers have for our community, as the streets and planters fill with garbage, residents exit buses in the middle of the street because Indian shoppers arrogantly park in bus lanes and crosswalks, and every new seating area is stained with spittle.The organizers of this selfish event seem to think that, having taken our major shopping street away from the community without a fight, they are entitled to control everything else they want, especially if it will drive non-Indian residents out of the neighborhood.

The noise level of the concert will be 120-150 decibels, comparable to jets taking off on a runway, This is scheduled to go on continuously from 2-7 pm. If the FIA organizers played by the rules they would have completed an application from the City’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events and provided a written response to this question:  “Will electronic sound amplification equipment or a public address system be used at the event? If yes, Indicate, on the Site Plan, the location of the stages and sound systems, the location and direction of all speakers, and the proximity to residential addresses.” The application also asks for the hours during which the amplified noise will occur, and what plans the organizers have for controlling the noise. What application? What site plan? What residential addresses? It’s our independence day! We’re entitled!

What kind of people would be so callous and insensitive toward others that they would deliberately inflict such noise? What kind of public official would permit it? And what is the bank’s responsibility to residents? Any decent person has to be appalled by the blatant disrespect for both the law and the residents that FIA organizers demonstrate every year.And let’s not forget the alderman’s callous indifference to what they’re doing. I once called the police to stop the noise, and one of the organizers told them that the alderman knew all about the event and to call her office. The cops left without doing anything.

My mother used to say that there’s nothing you can do when you’re dealing with people without a conscience. She was right. Clearly, FIA has none. Suggestions that FIA treat others the way it demands Indians be treated will have no effect. Pure political clout is being displayed here, and it’s meant to be seen.

And the alderman? Her gutless non-response to the excesses taking place on Devon every day will be another in an increasingly long list of failures that will become  campaign issues in 2018.

Insults like this event matter more in the long run than all the libraries in the world.

 

The 2018 Campaign Begins

Don’t tell me that the 2018 campaign hasn’t started yet. The alderman has redesigned  both her newsletter and her Web site, and the campaign’s first mailer, disguised as an invitation to a Town Hall meeting, has been sent to residents. As usual, Silverstein’s “Town Hall meeting” does NOT involve her reporting to her constituents what she’s been doing at City Hall, but instead features the ward’s two police commanders and focuses on crime, a tried-and-true topic for her. Raising fears that West Ridge trembles under an onslaught of criminal activity and that she is closely involved in advising the police is just another tactic in what’s sure to be a no-holds-barred attempt to keep  herself in power.

What other alderman would proudly proclaim that, after seven years in office, she’s added a date and topic headings to the ward’s newsletter? Who reads it? Ward residents who want to know what’s going on in City Council have to read some other alderman’s newsletter. She never reports to her constituents on how she voted on any City issue. Did you ever read her announcements of meetings or reports from the Ward’s Zoning Advisory Committee? Neighborhood Housing Advisory Board? Neighborhood Business Alliance? No. Those things don’t exist in the 50th Ward. Citizen participation in ward governance scares her. She won’t consider citizen input unless she can pack a board with supporters–and even then, she won’t tell the community who she’s appointed. Her Library Advisory Board is a case in point. Created March 17. Sworn to secrecy.  Nobody’s business who’s speaking in behalf of the neighborhood.

The Web site is now easier to navigate, but it’s the same old stuff. The Gallery may as well be retitled the Silverstein Family Album; it’s bursting with photos of the alderman, the alderman and Ira, the alderman at meetings, etc. Watch for most of these to be recycled into additional campaign pieces.

And then there’s crime. A sure-fire way to get the populace involved. There’s been a rash of thefts from unlocked cars and garages. There’s graffiti. This is not big-time stuff. The murders on Devon last year didn’t elicit public comment or meetings from the alderman. But careless people who don’t lock their doors deserve police time and attention? The fact is that West Ridge is one of the safest communities in the City. We shouldn’t have to be told by the police to behave with common sense and pick up and lock up after ourselves.

A true Town Hall meeting would require the alderman to engage with her constituents. Give-and-take, as long as it takes, not the standard one hour she can spare once or twice per term. It will never happen.

So far the usual collection of marginal opponents is surfacing, so she’ll be sure to repeat the tactic that worked so well for her in 2015–the “I’m too swell to stand in the room with write-ins, therefore I won’t participate in any debate.” It sure beats having to act as though she wants the office, rather than feels entitled to it.

 

 

 

Berny Stone Park

Today’s DNA Info reports that the alderman and unnamed community groups are supporting a proposal to name our new park at Devon & McCormick “Berny Stone Park.”  The City has begun the 45-day public comment period required before changing the name from Park 526 to Berny Stone Park. I first suggested the honor a year ago, and I’m glad to see that the alderman is acting on it.

 

 

 

The Menu Money Mess

The City’s Office of the Inspector General.(OIG) has released its audit of aldermanic menu money. OIG reports that the program is underfunded, does not follow the “best practices” recommended by the Government Financial Officers Association, and suffers management difficulties ranging from lack of communication between departments to the inability to develop a comprehensive citywide capital projects planning process.

Each ward’s menu money has remained fixed at $1.32M for the past ten years, while the costs of improvements (materials, labor) have increased. Projects are not prioritized by the City Department of Transportation (CDOT). Instead, each alderman decides which infrastructure improvements will be funded in a given ward—and which will not. Some City residents have a voice in how menu money is spent through participatory budgeting, but most do not. .

CDOT does not allocate funds on the basis of need. Put plainly, the City’s history of disinvestment in poorer wards and CDOT’s insistence on providing each alderman the same amount of menu money means that some areas of the City continue to deteriorate while others can spend on beautification.

In his April 19 letter forwarding the OIG report to the Mayor, aldermen, and other City officials, Inspector General Joseph M. Ferguson was blunt:

“OIG found that the administration of the Menu program does not align with best practices for infrastructure planning ….This audit identified significant concerns related to the City’s planning and management of residential infrastructure. For example, we determined that the allocation of $1.32 million per ward bears no relationship to the actual infrastructure needs of each ward.” [Emphasis added]

OIG recommends that infrastructure planning and repair be handled by CDOT, stating that “CDOT [should] fully inhabit its role in residential infrastructure planning by directly implementing a comprehensive, multi-year strategic capital plan for maintenance and improvement.” CDOT’s response?  “[T]he Department reasserted its general but analytically unsupported belief that current practice provides an “appropriate framework” for addressing core residential infrastructure needs.” [Emphasis added]

OIG also recommends that CDOT conduct a citywide analysis of residential infrastructure needs; and that the City allocate funding per ward based on that need.

The level of incompetence displayed by high-ranking City employees is staggering. Basic management practices are absent. Officials admit they don’t analyze needs or seek information from one another before creating budgets, and don’t measure what, if any, impact the allocated funding has. All the wards get the same amount of money, even if actual needs don’t justify it, because nobody has determined what each ward’s needs are.

Aldermen control infrastructure spending within the limits set by the level of funding the City can afford. The City pays high interest rates on its constant borrowing, leaving little money  available for capital improvement projects. For example, in  the book Chicago Is Not Broke budget expert Ralph Matire notes that, in 2016, 44% of the City budget was consumed by interest payments, while only 19% was allocated to infrastructure improvement.

The Illinois Campaign for Political Reform (ICPR) in its recent comments on the OIG report compared Chicago to other cities around the country.  In New York, the city’s DOT controls the process and the funding. In Los Angeles, a citywide database is used to track street conditions; resurfacing is determined by both need and cost. Houston and Philadelphia give responsibility for street improvements to their respective DOTs; streets are resurfaced based on need.

Some of the OIG more disturbing findings:

  • CDOT “does not perform comprehensive, long-term analysis to determine annual residential infrastructure needs…. “
  • Office of Management and Budget [OBM] “does not seek input from CDOT regarding estimated residential infrastructure need…”
  • Neither CDOT nor OBM has analyzed whether the menu money meets infrastructure needs.
  • CDOT does not prioritize projects, or insist that capital assets whose repair will increase in cost in future years be addressed first, but leaves decision-making to the aldermen
  • The fact that menu money spending is decided on an annual basis by individual aldermen prevents long-range, comprehensive, citywide infrastructure planning
  • Residential infrastructure needs were not fully met in any of the City’s fifty wards. (Pothole repair don’t count in terms of  infrastructure repair. Potholes are considered a “deficient piece” of a “whole component” ([the street), and do not replace the whole component when filled.).
  • In 2014, aldermen were allowed to spend menu money not only in the ward to which they were elected but also in areas added to their wards in the 2011 ward redistricting, even though the new ward boundaries would not take effect until 2015. {CDOT has accepted OIG’s recommendation that this practice be ended.]
  • Aldermen are permitted to spend menu money on non-infrastructure projects. [CDOT has said this practice will continue as long as rules and regulations governing funding sources are not broken.]
  • Nineteen aldermen failed to comply with CDOT deadlines for submitting menu money spending requests. [CDOT has agreed to enforce submission deadlines.]
  • The best-funded ward is the 46th, which covered 88.5% of its infrastructure needs from menu money, leaving a deficit of $218,563, while the worst-funded, the 34th ward, covered only 15.1% of its infrastructure needs, leaving a deficit of $9.5M. [Menu money does not reflect the size of the ward or the level of infrastructure repair that’s necessary. The 46th ward has only 165.6 street blocks and 80 alley blocks, compared to 888 street blocks and 677.6 alley blocks in the 34th.]
  • Installing a left-turn arrow cost $70,000 per intersection in 2014 (see pages 24-26 for CDOT cost breakdowns for repairs to streets, alleys, etc.)
  • OIG estimated the annualized costs for street and alley repairs over the life cycle of each type of repair. (See details of other repairs/replacements on page 30.)
    • What’s the annual cost of resurfacing a residential street? $4,950 per year for 20 years.
    • An alley?  $3,375 per year for 20 years.
    • Street lighting? $1,464 for 50 years.
    • Curb replacement?  $1,600 per year for 50 years.

Earlier this week I watched from my window as eight City workers planted a single sapling on a neighbor’s parkway. Seven men to dig the hole, stand the tree inside, and put the dirt back. The eighth man drove the forklift. I thought about this again over the past two days while reading the OIG report.

The private sector couldn’t operate this way. The very least a public employee should offer is competence. The very least an employee should expect is  a workplace that has a clearly-defined purpose and goals, and a planned, logical, and reasonable method of achieving those goals. How can a program be created to solve a problem that hasn’t been analyzed? How can a budget be prepared without the kind of basic information needed to establish an efficient and effective spending plan? How can departments working on the same problem not communicate with one another? sn’t anybody in charge?

No wonder so many people are voting with their feet.

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Let’s look at the findings specific to the 50th Ward.

To maintain the 50th Ward’s 383.2 residential street blocks and 304 residential alley blocks, OIG reports that $5,265,165 in menu money was spent from 2012-2015 on residential infrastructure improvements. It was allocated as follows:

  • 91.8%  – Streets
  •  5.91% – Street Lighting
  •  0.8%   – Sidewalks & Pedestrian-Related Projects
  •  1.3%  –  Alleys
  •   0.1% –  Traffic

From 2012-2015, no menu money was spent in the 50th on curbs and gutters, painting, cameras, bike lanes, the Chicago Park District, Chicago Public Schools, or any other CDOT or non-CDOT project.

In 2015, the cost of maintaining residential street and alley blocks was $4,856,947; menu money covered 34.6% of of that total and ADA-compliance funding another $360,000, leaving a deficit of $3,176,947.

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A Brief Community Meeting

The alderman has called a “brief community meeting” to discuss the new library building, this time with an emphasis on the senior housing to be built on the second and third floors. The meeting is scheduled for Monday, June 12, at Warren Park at 6:30 p.m.

Since last October’s announcement that a new library would finally be built, the alderman has held three meetings with residents (November 14, March 20, May 1) to discuss plans and listen to the concerns and opinions of the library’s users, residents, and the new building’s neighbors. The first meeting lasted two hours, the others one hour each, for a total of four hours of neighborhood input.

Two surveys were distributed. One, created by the LEARN Coalition, offered the alderman, the designers, and City officials detailed information about what library users want in the new facility. The other, created by the alderman and her secret advisory committee, provided information collected largely from non-users and schoolchildren. At best, it reinforced the information acquired by LEARN. Overall, it was a joke.

The alderman has yet to tell the residents of West Ridge who serves on her secret advisory committee and why and how they were chosen. She announced on March 17 that the committee had been formed but chose not to tell her constituents who was selected to represent them in critical discussions with CHA and the designers. As I understand it, the secret advisory committee learned of the June 12 meeting when residents did. This strongly suggests that all the decisions have been made and no further input is needed or wanted from residents or the secret advisory committee.

I wonder who’ll advise the CHA on which of the alderman’s supporters should score apartments for themselves, family members, and friends. CHA has already decided to create a new applicant pool for the building, rather than select the next 30 West Ridge residents on its current waitlists. Too many waitlists, better to start over, we were told. Politics should not play a role in tenant selection, but this is West Ridge, where one-family rule has rendered transparency irrelevant.

The library is scheduled to open in December 2018, just in time for the February 2019 municipal elections, not that there’s any connection. The existing library will close in September of 2018, just as the school year begins, to allow the transfer of books and other materials to the new building. A cynic might think that the political futures of the mayor and the alderman take precedence over the futures of neighborhood children.

Can’t you just see the gala opening? Ice and snow, subzero cold, gale-force winds, frozen microphones, shivering populace standing awestruck as Power lauds itself for spending our tax dollars to build a library and public housing with working electricity and a roof that doesn’t leak? Or maybe the building will open quietly, with the gala reserved for the following Spring.

After the elections.