CHA Hearing on Senior Apartments Set for Wednesday Evening–Maybe You Should Go

CHA will hold a hearing on the lease, house rules, and tenant selection process (TSP) for the new Northtown Apartments on Wedneday, July 12, at 6:00 p.m. at the Budlong Woods Library, 5630 North Lincoln. This is the only opportunity for West Ridge residents to speak directly to CHA representatives about the project. The public comment period began on June 28 and ends on July 28 at 5:00 p.m. Beginning July 13, all comments will need to be submitted via the CHA Web site.

The lease is marked “Final,” so I don’t know what good comments will do. The House Rules seem to require some clarification. In my opinion, they are overly-restrictive and provide too many opportunities to terminate leases. The proposed rules would, for example, penalize a tenant who went across the hall in her housecoat to have coffee with a neighbor, or who had a visitor who brought a dog. The rules are clearly aimed at restricting criminal behaviors and gang activity–good things–but I understood the Northtown Apartments would be home to middle-class seniors. However, despite statements to the community that the Northtown Apartments will draw its resident pool from people currently living in West Ridge, the TSP indicates otherwise.

Under the CHA’s right-of-return policy, CHA residents who held housing vouchers on or before October 1, 1999, have the right to apply for housing at the Northtown Apartments. Further, such applicants will be given priority over new applicants. This is not what CHA or Evergreen officials said at community meetings discussing eligibility  for the West Ridge housing.  I raised the question at one meeting: why wouldn’t the next thirty people on the CHA waitlist not be selected? In response, Eugene Jones, CHA Director, asked the audience directly if they didn’t want the tenants to be selected from the neighborhood’s own seniors, which the audience overwhelmingly did. I have no objections to the race or ethnicity of any individual applicant or tenant, but I do object to being misled by City and Evergreen officials. We are a neighborhood which welcomes all people, so there’s no need for this kind of subterfuge.

Another housing project proposed by Evergreen, developer of the Northtown Apartments, recently folded because of Evergreen’s failure to submit a final application to the State for the necessary tax credits, for which it had already received preliminary approval. Ald. Arena’s office said Evergreen had not requested a zoning change for the property. The 43-unit building would have been built at Milwaukee and Wilson.

The news report on this building notes that Evergreen failed to obtain tax credits for a proposed senior housing complex in 2011. I wonder if the tax credits for Northtown Library have been solidified.

I think there are still a lot of unanswered questions. Good thing there’s one public meeting. Too bad it couldn’t be held on a night when the Northtown Library is open late. And it’s too bad the alderman didn’t see fit to announce the public comment period, provide info on where and when the CHA meeting would be held, and invite neighborhood residents to attend.

Click here to read the Final Lease and the house rules.

The TSP can be read here.

 

“Affordable Housing & Community Design”

I attended this lecture yesterday and it was well worth attending. Jeff Bone of Landon Bone Baker Architects presented a wonderfully informative slide show about his firm’s approaches to affordable housing. It got me to thinking about how West Ridge residents might approach repurposing our current library and developing affordable housing in our neighborhood.

His firm has repurposed existing buildings to house homeless youth, low-income families with at least one family member suffering from a physical disability, and rehabbed SROs. Working with Casa Norte, for example, Bone’s firm created housing for 16 homeless young men, including a communal kitchen where they prepared and shared their meals.

In Roseland, his firm built several kinds of senior housing, including apartments for independent living and a building for assisted living as well as grandfamily housing for grandparents raising children as well as townhouses for single mothers.  It has also built new 3-bedroom homes.

The firm is also building developments of tiny houses (325 sq. ft.), currently a 12-house development centered around individual gardens, perfect for single adults or empty-nesters. Bone explained that, while a standard new house runs about $350,000 to build, a tiny house costs in the neighborhood of $80,000.

The firm has developed commercial spaces as well, and has worked with private developers as well as CHA.

West Ridge residents should hear what he has to say about developing / repurposing existing building, affordable housing, and building community–all with a green thumbprint. Some developments also include training kitchens so residents can work in the food service industry, and other vocational training.

Many thanks to Derrick Everett of West Ridge for bringing this talk to my attention. Now it needs a wider audience.

 

“Affordable Housing & Community Design” Discussion in Skokie Tomorrow

I learn so much from readers and neighbors who are seeking ways to improve our community. Reader Derrick Everett advises that “there’s a talk taking place on Sunday [March 26] at the Ethical Humanist Society in Skokie. And while this is not 50th Ward-specific, I think it’s relevant because it’s about affordable housing and community design, which are two subjects that were hot topics at this evening’s meeting.”

Thanks for sharing, Derrick!

Sustaining Community: Affordable Housing and Community Design in Chicago
Sunday, March 26, 10:30 a.m. – Noon

“Jeff Bone, a principal at Landon Bone Baker Architects, will discuss the work of his firm which specializes in community-based, affordable, and environmentally responsible housing and design in Chicago and the region. For almost 30 years, the firm has successfully balanced context, technology, and economy in its work while bringing a strong sense of ownership to the residents of a wide variety of new and rehabbed affordable, subsidized, and supportive housing developments.

From large-scale urban design and planning initiatives to small non-profit projects integrated into existing neighborhoods, Chicago’s diverse housing needs require unique design solutions both big and small for people in communities across the city.”

Ethical Humanist Society
7574 Lincoln Avenue (corner of Lincoln and Howard)
Skokie, IL