The 2018 Campaign Begins

Don’t tell me that the 2018 campaign hasn’t started yet. The alderman has redesigned  both her newsletter and her Web site, and the campaign’s first mailer, disguised as an invitation to a Town Hall meeting, has been sent to residents. As usual, Silverstein’s “Town Hall meeting” does NOT involve her reporting to her constituents what she’s been doing at City Hall, but instead features the ward’s two police commanders and focuses on crime, a tried-and-true topic for her. Raising fears that West Ridge trembles under an onslaught of criminal activity and that she is closely involved in advising the police is just another tactic in what’s sure to be a no-holds-barred attempt to keep  herself in power.

What other alderman would proudly proclaim that, after seven years in office, she’s added a date and topic headings to the ward’s newsletter? Who reads it? Ward residents who want to know what’s going on in City Council have to read some other alderman’s newsletter. She never reports to her constituents on how she voted on any City issue. Did you ever read her announcements of meetings or reports from the Ward’s Zoning Advisory Committee? Neighborhood Housing Advisory Board? Neighborhood Business Alliance? No. Those things don’t exist in the 50th Ward. Citizen participation in ward governance scares her. She won’t consider citizen input unless she can pack a board with supporters–and even then, she won’t tell the community who she’s appointed. Her Library Advisory Board is a case in point. Created March 17. Sworn to secrecy.  Nobody’s business who’s speaking in behalf of the neighborhood.

The Web site is now easier to navigate, but it’s the same old stuff. The Gallery may as well be retitled the Silverstein Family Album; it’s bursting with photos of the alderman, the alderman and Ira, the alderman at meetings, etc. Watch for most of these to be recycled into additional campaign pieces.

And then there’s crime. A sure-fire way to get the populace involved. There’s been a rash of thefts from unlocked cars and garages. There’s graffiti. This is not big-time stuff. The murders on Devon last year didn’t elicit public comment or meetings from the alderman. But careless people who don’t lock their doors deserve police time and attention? The fact is that West Ridge is one of the safest communities in the City. We shouldn’t have to be told by the police to behave with common sense and pick up and lock up after ourselves.

A true Town Hall meeting would require the alderman to engage with her constituents. Give-and-take, as long as it takes, not the standard one hour she can spare once or twice per term. It will never happen.

So far the usual collection of marginal opponents is surfacing, so she’ll be sure to repeat the tactic that worked so well for her in 2015–the “I’m too swell to stand in the room with write-ins, therefore I won’t participate in any debate.” It sure beats having to act as though she wants the office, rather than feels entitled to it.

 

 

 

New Info on Library-Senior Housing Building

There’s some new information that the alderman won’t tell you about but I will.

CHA has made available its “Draft Tenant Selection Plan (TSP), Lease, and other documents that will apply to resident occupancy at Independence or Northtown Apartments.” Note that the posted Lease from Evergreen is in its final form. Some of Evergreen’s House Rules may require modification or explanation.

For example, no volunteer work may be performed within any apartment. Does this include phone calls in behalf of a neighborhood group, or stuffing envelopes? No turkey frying is permitted, and neither is a turkey fryer. No candles, either. Tenants with a prescription for medical marijuana may not smoke the pot in the building. This seems unduly harsh. Forcing the old folks out into the snow so they can smoke medical marijuana for pain relief? Sheesh.

I found the pet policies interesting. Only one fur-bearing animal or two birds per unit, although tenants can have an “unlimited number of fish,” or at least as many as will fit in a 10-gallon tank. Tenants can have visitors, but play dates for their dogs or cats are not allowed in the building.

Tenants can have overnight visitors only 20 days per year.

NOTE: The public comment period began at 8:00 a.m. on June 28 and expires at 5:00 p.m. on July 28. The public hearing will be held  July 12 at  6:00 p.m. at the Budlong Woods Library, 5630 N Lincoln, Chicago, IL

 

 

Dulhan’s Does It Right

Thanks to Dulhan’s for celebrating America’s Independence Day! It was the only store between California and Western that recognized our country’s birthday.

Dulhan’s displays the American flag on Devon.

It bothers me every year that the merchants on Devon do not recognize or celebrate July 4, yet barely six weeks later the street is festooned with Indian and Pakistani flags and posters celebrating each country’s independence day. America has welcomed its immigrant residents and their businesses, yet there’s no reciprocity. Is it really too much to ask merchants doing business on Devon Avenue to show their gratitude for the opportunities America has given them by acknowledging America’s birthday?

Dulhan’s is to be congratulated for the time and thought given to the store’s patriotic display. The area (southwest corner of Devon and Talman) really looked lovely,

and the flag display added to the beauty of the seating area outside the store.

These were the only American flags to be found on Devon.

For those who haven’t tried Indian clothing, I recommend Dulhan’s. A few years ago my husband, who had suffered a stroke that left him blind and confined to a wheelchair, wanted some comfortable cotton clothing for summer. We purchased two outfits at Dulhan’s that were beautifully made, with intricate embroidery on the tunics. We laughed at the huge pants on one set, but their drawstring waist somehow made the pants just right. And the colors didn’t fade. The staff could not have been kinder or more patient with us.

Frankly, I don’t feel welcome in most of the stores east of California (with good reason, as some are now displaying window signs advising that they reserve the right to refuse service to anyone, no reason for such refusal specified). One merchant, reacting to my stopping to window-shop, picked up his cell phone, opened his door, and snarled “What do you want?” Such behaviors don’t encourage the wider community to support the merchants.

But I can confidently recommend Dulhan’s, not only for its merchandise and its friendly staff, but also because I like people who are proud to be Americans, no matter what their ethnic background. And I believe in supporting local businesses that recognize and celebrate the birth of our nation.

 

 

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Avy Meyers

Avy Meyers, host of the award-winning news program North Town News and publisher of the newspaper Jewish Chicago, died over the Memorial Day weekend.

His cable TV program was truly must-see TV. Both a gracious host and a tough questioner, Avy never hesitated to inject his own strong opinions. I looked forward to the election editions of Jewish Chicago because of the strong reasoning for his endorsements. I didn’t always agree with him, but I could understand and appreciate his thought process. He never hesitated to call it the way he saw it. He brought the same qualities to his role as CAPS Beat Coordinator, serving in that capacity for several years until stepping down this March.

By all accounts he was a good neighbor and a loyal friend. Breitbart News lauded him as a “citizen journalist.”  I think he’d be proud of that.

Avy Meyers was a West Ridge treasure, and he will be missed.

Call for Recipes for Rogers Park / West Ridge Cookbook

The Rogers Park / West Ridge Historical Society is seeking recipes for its new community cookbook. Everyone in the neighborhood–as well as former residents–can contribute a favorite recipe, from appetizers to desserts. Submissions that reflect the diversity of our neighborhood are encouraged. The Society is also willing to work with restaurants and caterers to convert recipes for home use.

Your name will appear with your recipe. You can also contribute a recipe to honor the memory of someone special, maybe the grandmother who taught you how to bake cookies, or the friend who shared her special recipe for brisket. You can even include a short comment or tip to be printed with your recipe. I once burned out the motor of a hand mixer while beating in lots of luscious cream cheese to make my favorite pineapple cheesecake, so my recipe will carry a warning to use a stand mixer. (The stench from a burned motor is far worse than that from burned toast. Unfortunately, I’ve burned both.)

The cookbook will cost $18; it’s scheduled for publication in October 2017.

Submission deadline is June 30. You can submit your recipes online or download the forms here. Or you can stop by the Historical Society’s office to pick the forms up.
(7363 North Greenview, in Jarvis Square just south of dog groomer Rogers Bark) on Wednesdays or Saturdays (10:00 am. – 4:00 pm.).

Libraries

I don’t like the interior design of the new library because I think it panders to our worst behavioral excesses. Library administrators seem to believe that turning places for learning into Starbucks with books will somehow improve scholarship and build community. “This is the way libraries are used now,” is what I hear. But should we exchange peace and quiet for excessive noise and bad behavior?

I visited the Chinatown library to see the new design and booked a computer for a couple of hours in the afternoon. A few minutes later, two men arrived with their coffee and newspapers, and began a long, laugh-filled talk at normal conversational levels. A young man sat with his laptop and cell phone, and began returning a series of calls while surfing the Web. People called out to one another across the room. At the Edgewater library it’s especially bad when teens are present, because their TV is blasting and they scream at one another as if they were in a park. When the kids take over after school, Northtown is so noisy it’s hard to think.

Why do we encourage such behavior? Why is it so wrong to tell people who demand safe spaces and freedom from bullying that their own behavior is antisocial? That disturbing other people is unacceptable? That running, shouting, and other behaviors acceptable outside do not belong indoors?

CPL gave up on encouraging good behavior when it allowed cell phone use and coffee in the library. I’ve listened to people discussing their HIV status, toileting habits, overdue bills, and domestic fights while they browse the stacks or surf the Web. Kids run through libraries the way they run through parks. Adults greet neighbors and carry on conversations as though they were in their own homes and not in a public place where other people are trying to read, write, or perform some research activity, whether a term paper or family tree. Libraries used to be the places one could find peace and quiet for reading and reflection. Now they’re designed to encourage conversation and raucous behavior.

Someone once said that Starbucks is where we go to be alone together, everyone in his own chair focused on a laptop or phone, latte at hand.

Libraries are like that now. Too bad.

Prayers for the Police

Tomorrow, Thursday, May 4, at 6:30 p.m., there will be a prayer vigil for 24th District police officers at the Rogers Park station, 6464 North Clark Street. The nondenominational service will pray for the safety of the officers who patrol our neighborhood and keep us safe.

Please go if you can as a show of support for the dedicated men and women who give so much to our community and ask so little in return.

Is Chicago Broke? Find Out at the Northtown Library on April 27

The West Ridge Community Organization (WRCO) and People of West Ridge (POWR)are co-sponsoring a book discussion on Thursday, April 27, at the Northtown Library. Our guests will be the editor and authors of “Chicago Is Not Broke: A Guide to Funding the City We Deserve.”  While the City waits to learn whether the Mayor will raise taxes and/or fees or simply borrow the money to cover the $200M shortfall in the Chicago Public Schools’ budget, residents can explore other solutions that, if implemented, could result in a tax reduction. Yes, you heard that right.

Each chapter’s author(s) explores a single topic in depth, including TIFs, a public bank, a progressive income tax, the costs of corruption, and the impact of toxic bank deals that force the City to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on debt service payments before a single penny can be spent on City services.

Authors of the book include former alderman Dick Simpson, Hilary Denk, an attorney and a Director of the League of Women Voters of Illinois, 2015 mayoral candidate Amara Enyia, former reporter and communications consultant Thomas J. Graedel, Chicago Teachers Union Staff Coordinator Jackson Pollock, and economics professor Ron Baiman. Editor Tom Tresser is well-known to Chicagoans as the man who first questioned the costs of staging the 2016 Olympics in Chicago and organized the “No Games Chicago” movement.

Books will be available for $12.

Please join us at the Northtown Library on Thursday, April 27, from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. for a lively discussion. You’ll also have an opportunity volunteer to work on some initiatives for West Ridge improvement.

 

 

Post-Survey Thoughts

So, where were we? Oh, yes. The alderman gave the architects the results of her library survey—the one that showed that 7 out of 10 respondents don’t use the Northtown Library, slightly more than half of respondents (52%) never even visit the Northtown Library, and 76% of the 600 respondents under age 16 voted in favor of a coffee bar but did not support space for the community to meet. She said these results would aid in designing the library we all need and want.

The alderman also stated in her newsletter that the LEARN Survey obtained similar results. It did not. It asked different questions, but even where the questions were comparable, results differ significantly. This is because the LEARN Survey was a serious attempt to gather information from the community, and not a last-minute pastiche of poorly-conceived questions designed to deflect attention from the lack of information coming from the alderman’s office.

Had the alderman been serious about gathering information, she would have taken the time to properly design her survey: First question: Do you use the Northtown Library? “Yes” respondents should have been directed to one set of follow-up questions, “No” respondents to another set. It’s more important for planners to know WHY someone doesn’t use the library than to know that non-users would like to have a coffee bar. It should not be up to the alderman, the architects, or the residents to guess at the reasons people don’t use the Northtown facility; that question should have been part of the survey. If answers are subject to interpretation, then the survey has failed its most important test: Does it tell us what we want to know?

Input from the neighborhood’s children could have been captured by a separate survey designed with them in mind. Children should have a voice in selecting books and media bought for their use, but they should not be voting on the need for a community meeting room.

Whoever thought it a good idea to have the kids take the survey in class or for homework or whatever other reason has done the community a disservice. I’m sure it was meant well, but the overwhelming number of under-16 responses means the survey’s results are distorted and therefore almost meaningless.To disregard the children’s vote is as bad as giving it too much weight. Did the alderman attempt to mitigate the disproportionate response from the youngest group when she sent the results downtown? If so, how? If not, why? Was there any cover letter outlining her interpretation of the results?  Can we see it?

The survey-takers did not include one key demographic—those aged 17 to 25. These young adults are finishing high school, starting or in college or grad school, or just beginning their work lives, seeking jobs and opportunities to help get a start in life. Only seven people in this age range took the survey, and that is simply not representative of the neighborhood.

Transmitting highlights of the survey results to the community via the alderman’s weekly newsletter was in my opinion the wrong way to make the results available. For one thing, not everybody subscribes to her newsletter; for another, those who get print copies don’t have access to the full survey results (the link to those is a “click here” function, not a URL). I had hoped that the alderman and her Advisory Board would take the time to pull the results of her survey and the LEARN survey together so that the community—and the architects—might gather truly useful information that would be fully and fairly considered as the building plans move forward. I had also hoped that the alderman would then discuss these results with residents.

Instead we got an information dump on the weekend before Passover and Holy Week, with the alderman’s Devon office closed for three of the following five work days.

Time is rapidly slipping away and I wonder if it’s already too late for residents to play a significant role in this project. If the building is to be delivered on schedule—December 2018, 20 months from now—you can bet more decisions have already been finalized than we now know. Maybe the quest for  “community input” is nothing more than the sham already suspected.

The last community meeting was on March 20, more than three weeks ago. The “many, many meetings” promised are not being scheduled. Alderman?

 

 

 

 

The Alderman’s Library Survey

Results from the alderman’s survey, released yesterday, make interesting reading.  I don’t know whether to laugh or cry. According to the alderman’s newsletter, “more than 1,500 people have completed” her survey, reportedly “…a broad and diverse segment of the 50th Ward” including “speakers of all the major languages spoken in the neighborhood….”  [There was a question on the survey asking which languages respondents speak, but the survey itself was available online only in English.] The alderman says that she’s “…given the survey results to the project architects, so they can use your comments and input to design a library that fits the unique needs and desires…” of West Ridge residents.

A closer look at the results reveals that:

  • 68% of respondents don’t use the Northtown Library
    • 32% use a different library
    • 36% don’t use Northtown
    • 32% use Northtown.
  • 52% of respondents don’t even visit the Northtown Library
  • 37% of respondents are over age 50 (555 respondents based on 1,500 total)
    • Their votes were distributed most evenly across choices; the only group to highly rank adult reading space and community meeting rooms as top priorities
    • 63% want an outdoor reading space
    • 56% want a coffee bar
  • 23% of respondents are between ages 16 and 49 (345 respondents) with  (2%, or 7 respondents, between ages 16 – 25)
    • Overwhelmingly in favor of children’s space and technology; fewest votes for community meeting rooms and adult reading spaces (no surprises here–these are the prime parenting years)
    • 73% want an outdoor reading space
    • 63% want a coffee bar
  • 40% of respondents are children 16 and under (600 respondents)
    • Most votes for technology, children’s and teen spaces; very little interest in adult reading space; least interested in community meeting rooms
    • 83% want an outdoor reading space
    • 76% want a coffee bar

This is community input? The alderman passed this along to the architects as what the community wants? A coffee bar chosen by children? Results determined by people who don’t use the library? Who don’t even visit? Who apparently took the survey as a classroom exercise? If we build the coffee bar, will the children come?

I sometimes wonder if the alderman is paying attention to what she’s doing. It’s simply inexcusable to present her survey results to the architects when they are clearly just plain goofy.  It’s irresponsible of her to ignore the results of the LEARN survey, which was not heavily influenced by kids but was taken by thoughtful adults trying to provide serious input on a major community project. Had she gone to the community for input sooner, she might have designed a survey whose results could have been useful in planning the new library.

The alderman should have scrapped her survey results and started over.

Unless we want 600 kids to be the determining factor in what kind of library we get.